Haught

Purveyors of fine sarcasm

Tag: language

Haught Take: Personal Branding

In 2017, personal branding has earned a special significance in the world. It’s at least as important to humans as a healthy endocrine system and will presumably one day replace our need for a beating heart.

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Haught Take: Innovation

Only the true innovator understands this cruel truth.

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Haught Take: is the rudest word “cunt”?

Other traditional insults and pointed adjectives aren’t even close: fuck, shit, motherfucking, corporal javelin. Pff. My grandma uses all of them. And she’s dead. She just shouts them from her grave as an animated skeleton.

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How good words turn bad

The items that we now categorise as weasel words, wank language and corporate buzzwords weren’t always the indefensible, indecipherable brain-slop of desk-shackled keyboard tappers. Almost every single one began as a word or term that didn’t make you want to chainsaw it alive and throw its corpse into an abandoned quarry.

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The Haught guide to “deep dives”

I’m all for metaphors. If variety is the spice of life then metaphors are the smoked paprika of language. I…

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The Haught guide to “downsizing”

One day, in the not too distant future people will be coming home from work telling their partners “Love – I was permanently de-salaried today because the company’s optimaligning has led to my role being seajourneyed.”

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The Haught guide to the word “strategic”

In this ultra-cynical age, the word ‘panacea’ has been splashed with negative connotations. The 21st century has no time for…

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The Haught guide to “moving forward”

“Moving forward” (aka “going forward”) seems as popular today as when it first burst on to the corporate scene like an alien out of an unimportant character’s chest.

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The Haught guide to “journeys”

I don’t ask much from you, dear reader, so when I tell you today that I have a task for…

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Benign to Five on obliterating wank language

“It’s a beautiful thing, the destruction of words.” At least that’s what the character Syme from George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four reckons. Syme…

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